Tag Archives: knowledge

Subjective vs. objective belief

I shared a funny Onion article I found on Facebook some months ago. The article describes a fictional boy returning home after receiving his undergraduate philosophy degree. The boy remarks to his father that: “There is no rational justification for belief!” Today, this has gotten me thinking about a more subjective view of belief versus the one I engaged with as an undergrad in philosophy. In the latter, knowledge is equated with justified true belief (in mathematical form–K=JTB).

Certainly, K=JTB is the preferred formula for scientific belief. Empirical science relies on the shared sensory perception of data, and established analytic procedures to run it through. K=JTB seems a useful philosophical companion to this hypothetico-deductive approach to reaching knowledge*.

K=JTB clearly shows that–in order to attain knowledge–belief should be (rationally) justified. But it occurred to me that there are certain kinds of belief of the more subjective kind that cannot be plugged into K=JTB, yet are nonetheless indispensable. I am thinking particularly of religious knowledge, or more appropriately conviction. Intuitive knowing of this kind might seem risky at the outset, yet we are always operating under a certain degree of uncertainty. Conviction is what pushes us through such moments to make a decision and be open to its consequences.

And while experience might not be empirically falsifiable (though it can be dismissed), it may still be shared meaningfully between participants. Such individuals can trust their experience and share interpretations of it with the involved other; these interpretations can meld into a common understanding of what has taken place. Experience seems to demand subjective belief if we are to view the former as inherently meaningful.

*Of course, data science has its own hierarchy of knowledge, where data becomes information which becomes knowledge. Belief’s role is unclear here.

Is faith a kind of knowledge?

Pure faith has to be a special kind of knowledge. Faith must be blind: to be respected, it ought not to be challenged.

Faith is conviction in what can only be felt intuitively. As such, it cannot be scientific; it need not be checked against externality.

Faith in the ultimate is irrational. It may be a kind of knowing rather than knowledge–it cannot be denied, once had. To attempt such would be to reject God’s gift to us.

Faith is the absolute episteme. It can be placed in anything, and is holy as such. The holy person cannot break something so sacred!

Knowledge of faith is only afforded by genuine wisdom.

Power, knowledge, meaning

How are these three concepts related?

Many of us have heard the adage: “With great power, comes great responsibility.” (Thanks, Uncle Ben!)

Adding to the adage above, knowledge is often equated with power–knowledge is power.

If knowledge is power, and with great power comes great responsibility…well, maybe great knowledge is required for great power.

We can achieve great knowledge, thereby attaining great power (and so, great responsibility). How does meaning fit in?

For psychologist Jordan Peterson, meaning derives from the responsible life. If we achieve great responsibility from the above chain, we should expect great meaning!

Insight and wisdom

In yesterday’s post, I discussed wisdom’s relation to curiosity and knowledge. How does insight factor in?

Psychologically, insight is the process and outcome of crystallized, meaningful realization.

With no insight, could we have wisdom?

Let’s adopt the data scientific view of wisdom following from knowledge, where knowledge is meaningful information. Here, we have stumbled upon meaning!

Meaning is part-and-parcel of both knowledge and insight. Specifically: an insight occurs to me after exhausting my efforts trying to solve a problem. Insight presents itself as an answer worth testing at the least; at the most, it bolsters my resolve with conviction and energy.

Insight is achieved after information has been placed in its proper, solution-focused context. After ensuring that it is genuine (because the insight works for our specific purpose), we may say that it has given us knowledge.

Given the above, we know that insight is a necessary step toward attaining wisdom. Logically–therefore–clarifying the distinction between insight-driven knowledge and wisdom becomes the next, salient task.