180°

Put a protractor over the weekend–
180 degrees from Friday to Monday;
Another 180 from Monday to Friday:
The week’s a 360° spinrush!

Muses

The Muse visits us

If we deserve Her company,

If we should be so

Fortunate

Our lives will be blessed;

Enriched

Pleasant and interesting:

Pretty, and divine…

Noble, and sublime.

Give her your time–

And rhyme!

Marx, Rousseau, Smith, and Sartre

Marx believed that capitalist working classes would rise up and revolt against the upper classes. Rousseau believed humans join society upon agreement to a “socpopial contract”. Adam Smith advocated for laissez-faire economics, believing that an “invisible hand” could correct such an economy toward equilibrium.

The Qur’an states that the oppressed have rights to defend themselves from oppressors. Are socioeconomic upper classes rightly oppressing those beneath them? Is a Marxist-style revolt justified?

Rousseau’s theory of social contract is existential (e.g., Sartrean) to the extent that being thrown into the world usually lands humans into society.

Given the above state of affairs, can lower classes voluntarily exit their (unequal, and so undesirable) social contracts? If not, and if they are being oppressed–sweatshop labor is an noncontroversial example–then they have the religious right to revolt (per Islam).

Postmodernism and behavior

Let us define postmodernism here as emphasizing nurture (cultural or societal influence) over nature (biological influence).

Where do we ground human behavior? Does nature or nurture determine it?

If behavior is granted to be psychological, rather than only physiological, then we must contend with whether we act with agency.

The more agentically we act, the stronger nurture’s role is.

In other words: the more free will we humans possess, the more postmodern we are.

We shouldn’t ignore our biology. But to what extent does it constrain or define what we do?

Genetics predisposes us toward certain behaviors over others. This equates with tendency, but not hard determinism.

Similarly, our environments play a role in what we can do, should do, and ultimately do.

What do societal and/or cultural influence look like? Society consists in two or more people who agree (i.e., they enter into a “contract”) on certain axioms for living. These comprise said society’s ethics.

Culture, I have argued, consists in preferred modes of being and doing. Such constitutes our style, or “art” of being. We have “tastes” for and against certain modes of living.

Societally, then, our behavior is governed by our agreed-upon ethics. Culturally, what we do should capitalize on our desired ways of being.

Arguably, society is largely a modern construct. Culture may be granted to be more evolutionarily recent: it is postmodern.

Postmodern living is how we freely choose to cope with facticity (including law and the world of physical objects: what we are “thrown” into the world amidst). Societal living consists in fulfilling our formal roles as social beings, e.g. providing for our families and others.

Postmodernity grants us individual freedom, given that we act sufficiently as responsible social agents.

My review of Pokémon Sword

Where to begin? This was a game full of drama, battle-highs, and just classic Pokémon. This post summarizes my post-completion thoughts and feelings.

Eternatus: a Rayquaza-Naganadel hybrid (in terms of typing and appearance), but red. This is the first time players have caught the third member from the main legendary trio prior to getting through the title legend. Battling Eternatus looked like a Golden Sun final boss battle…

Speaking of Poké-firsts and title legends, this is the first time we got to battle and catch them post-game.

The open-world graphics were fantastic! The Wild Area is a real treat. Third-stage evolutions in the wild is rad (though, not entirely new for Pokémon GO players).

Just to make this post more personal, my final team consisted of Cinderace (so cool), Drednaw, Eldegoss, Boltund, Orbeetle, and Corviknight. Though I found myself curious about and intersted in other Pokémon – primarily, newer ones including formes – I stuck with this team for the game’s duration.

I caught a Timid Eternatus and Lonely Zacian on my first and only capture attempts. Not bad!

Hop was a natural step forward from Hau (Sun/Moon and Ultra Sun/Ultra Moon). Like Simon, he’s just a bit too…nice? I never cared for Oak’s line in Let’s Go! Pikachu and Eevee, which went that Simon was maybe too nice to win. Hop has even more spirit than past rivals, and he’s the first of ours to get his own main legendary!

I enjoyed the plot. Team Yell was the nicest team we’ve had in a core series Pokémon game, to date. Marnie was a nice upgrade from Lillie in terms of competitiveness. Macro Cosmos felt a bit underdeveloped, but was reminiscent of Lusamine’s Aether Foundation (again, from Sun/Moon and Ultra Sun/Ultra Moon).

My Charmander gift from Leon (Lance-like but nicer, anyone?) was Relaxed. Kind of want to train it to use Gigantamax Charizard…should have resetted for a better nature?…

I caught every new Pokémon that I encountered, plus a few old ones.

The reintroduction of the Battle Tower is cool. I feel more motivated to complete this Pokédex than in Generation 6… (For background, I last completed the Pokédex in Pokémon Black.)

May add more as it comes to me. Solid game, GAME FREAK! 5/5